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Top Attractions for Jodhpur Travel

The majestic city of Jodhpur is a sight to behold. Dating back thousands of years ago, this city in India is the second largest city in the state of Rajasthan. Jodhpur is often called the Blue City, because of the bright blue hues of its old houses. But it is also known as the Sun City, in large part due to the sunny weather that shines on the city for the majority of the year. Travelers have always loved visiting Jodhpur because of the breath-taking palaces, forts and buildings that can be found in the city.

Jodhpur travel

Leafcanoer, aartideetoo, recently shared their experiences in Jodhpur in the leaf, “Blue Jodhpur – Sun City of India.” In it, aartideetoo highlights the top attractions to visit for Jodhpur travel.

Here is a look at the top attractions to visit in Jodhpur:

Umaid Bhawan Palace
The Umaid Bhawan Palace is known as one of the largest private residences in the world, partially managed by the Taj Hotels chain. The palace was built between 1929 and 1943, and has over 300 rooms, some of which house the Jodhpur royal family. Part of the palace also houses a museum, which is open to the public to tour.

The palace is built from a combination of sandstone and marble, set over 26 acres of land. As the Jodhpur royal family still lives within the palace, there are a number of decorations dedicated to the royal family, including the family’s coat of arms. The palace architecture pulls from Indo-Gothic, Classical Revival, and Art Deco styles, as well as influences from traditional Hindu and Buddhist architecture. The result is a magnificent space worth visiting.

Jodhpur travel

Jaswant Thada
The tomblike monument of Jaswant Thada was built in 1899 by Maharaja Sardar Singh, in honor of his father, Maharaja Jaswant Singh. The structure of the memorial is built from carved sheets of marble, and the grounds surrounding the monument include a garden, lake, gazebos, and several other mausoleums.

Jodhpur travel

Mehrangarh Fort
The highlight of any trip to Jodhpur is a visit to Mehrangarh Fort, one of the largest forts in India. Set on a hill 410 feet above the city, the Mehrangarh Fort is a looming and imposing presence in the city of Jodhpur. The structure is enclosed by thick walls, and within these walls are several palaces and gardens worth exploring, as well as a museum that is open to the public. Visitors can view the museum’s large collection of palanquins, the popular mode of transportation for the Indian nobility, as well a rare collection of armory from every historical era in Jodhpur.

The Mehrangarh Fort was initially built in 1460 by Rao Jodha as a way to protect the newly founded city of Jodhpur. However, the fort took over 500 years to be completed, with the latest installation completed in the 20th century. The fort can be entered through a series of seven gates, the most notable of which are Jai Pol (Gate of Victory), Fateh Pol, Dedh Kamgra Pol, and Loha Pol.

Visitors to Mehrangarh Fort can also explore the area surrounding the fort. The Rao Jodha Desert Rock Park, adjacent to Mehrangarh Fort, was created in 2006 in an effort to restore the natural landscape and ecology of the area. There are several trails that visitors can follow to explore the 200 acre park, providing travelers an opportunity to see the plants native to the area.

Jodhpur travel

For the intrepid traveler, Jodhpur certainly sparks a sense of adventure and intrigue. But these three sites are just the tip of the iceberg for anyone interested in Jodhpur travel. The city is a treasure trove of unique finds and cultural experiences. For more ideas of what to see in Jodhpur, check out more of aartideetoo’s leaf by downloading the LeafCanoe app.

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How to Prepare for Travel to Rajasthan

The Indian state of Rajasthan is a traveler’s dream come true. With a multitude of color-themed cities, as well as countless festivals being celebrated in the area, Rajasthan invokes in the traveler the quintessential image of India: vibrant, colorful, and full of culture.

LeafCanoer, aartideetoo, recently shared their insights on Rajasthan in their leaf titled, “Golden City of Rajasthan – Jaisalmer.” From exploring the Jaisalmer Fort to riding camels in the Sam Sand Dunes, aartideetoo’s leaf provides plenty of ideas for travel to Rajasthan.

Aartideetoo’s experiences in Rajasthan are sure to inspire you to embark on your own trip to the area. Before you go, however, here are a few things to help you prepare for travel to Rajasthan:

Brush up on your history
Rajasthan has one of the richest and most developed cultures in India, with so much history packed into one state. Officially formed in March 1949, the state of Rajasthan was once part of the Indus Valley Civilization. Many of the major tribes in India – the Rajputs, Jats, Meenas, Gurjars, and countless others – have contributed to the creation of the state of Rajasthan. Their influences, as well as the Mughal influence, can be seen in many of the forts and palaces that dot the area.

Travel to Rajasthan

Invest in a good camera
One of the perks of being in such a historical place is the abundance of palaces and historical buildings, which serves as a wealth of inspiration for the budding travel photographer. Bring along a good camera that will be able to perfectly capture the sights of the area. Rajasthan is known for being one of the most colorful regions of India. It is also known for having a strong classical music and dance tradition, so being able to record dance and music performances are necessary for any visit to Rajasthan.

Travel to Rajasthan

Take along some pocket change
The colors of Rajasthan come not only from the buildings and architecture, but also from the abundance of fabrics and goods that can be found in the markets. Take some time to explore the shopping in the area. The dollar is strong in India, so if you’re American, it will be relatively easy to buy good quality products for an affordable price. Though you’ll most likely be quoted the foreigner price, it’s customary to engage in some bargaining when you shop.

Travel to Rajasthan

Bring along your appetite
Indian food may not suit everyone’s palate, but there are definitely some delectable delights to be found in Rajasthan. Be prepared to sample some of the local cuisine while visiting the area. Rajasthan cuisine is different from the cuisine found in most Indian restaurants in the United States. Due to the scarcity of water, milk is often used as a substitute, and subsequently, much of the cuisine features the use of milk and milk products.

Travel to Rajasthan

Clear your calendar
There are a lot of things to see and do in Rajasthan. To fully experience the area, it’s best to spend at least a week, so be sure you have adequate time in your travel schedule. Popular cities to visit in Rajasthan include Jaipur (also known as the Pink City), Udaipur (known as Venice of the East), Jodphur (sometimes called Sun City and sometimes called the Blue City), and Jaisalmar (often called the Golden City). There are also a number of festivals that happen in the area. One of the local favorites is the desert festival, which features traditional costumes, snake charmers, puppeters, and folk performers.

Travel to Rajasthan

There are so many things to see and experience in Rajasthan. Just one trip is not enough to fully capture what that state has to offer. By far, the most important thing to remember when planning your travel to Rajasthan is to leave more for next time.

Interested in learning more about travel to Rajasthan? Download the LeafCanoe app and check out more of     artideetoo’s leaf.

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Rajasthani camel traders at the Pushkar Fair.

The Holy Town of Pushkar

Rajasthan is a desert state in India’s far west. It occupies the area between Pakistan and New Delhi/Agra, and it is one of India’s most visited regions. This is partially due to its convenient accessibility from New Delhi, but also because among its vast desert expanses Rajasthan has some truly remarkable sights. Gigantic fortresses stand guard on mountain tops, opulent palaces house the remnants of Rajasthani royalty, bustling markets bring life to dusty towns, and holy temples dot the landscape.

Among all of this, Pushkar would seem to be an unspectacular destination. It is, after all, only a small town on a lake. But what Pushkar does have is some pretty serious spiritual significance.

Pushkar is a mandatory stop on the Hindu pilgrimage route, as one has to bathe in its holy lake if a pilgrim hopes achieve salvation. This lake is said to have been created by Lord Brahma—one of Hinduism’s three central deities—when he dropped a lotus flower to earth in order to determine the site of his impending holy sacrifice.

Pilgrims at the holy lake of Pushkar. Photo credit Fulvio / CC BY.

Pilgrims at the holy lake of Pushkar. Photo credit Fulvio / CC BY.

Brahma grew impatient—as one might do when waiting to commit suicide—while waiting for his wife Savitri to arrive, so he took a second wife. Savitri, as would be expected, was furious at this news and vowed that Brahma would never be worshiped outside of Pushkar.

Or at least this is the story told to explain why Pushkar is one of the only places in the world with a Brahma Temple.

Pilgrims arriving to Pushkar will usually make their way to the Brahma Temple where they consult with its resident holy men before performing a sacred ritual in the lake. Tourists are welcome to participate in the blessings as well, and there are always touts around who are eager to assist—for a small fee.

To pay one’s respects to Savitri requires a bit more effort than bathing in the lake, as her temple is situated on the top of a hill overlooking Pushkar. The climb can be done in as little as an hour and the views are excellent, but in the scorching desert heat the walk can be strenuous. It’s not unusual to see older worshipers struggling on the hillside path.

The view of Pushkar and its holy lake from the Savitri Temple.

The view of Pushkar and its holy lake from the Savitri Temple.

Beyond just its spiritual significance, however, Pushkar also has a burgeoning tourist trade. This is best seen when walking through the town market, as it resembles one large tourist bazaar. Here shops sell everything from arts and crafts to souvenir clothing.

Pushkar’s most interesting shopping experience, however, is the annual Pushkar Fair. Held in October-November, this is one of the world’s largest livestock fairs, with the animal of choice being the camel. Villagers from across Rajasthan descend upon Pushkar and the city does its best to provide a celebratory ambiance. If you are anywhere near Pushkar during the fair, do not miss it, but be prepared for the city’s “unique” smell, as thousands of camels in a small town are no joke!

Rajasthani camel traders at the Pushkar Fair.

Rajasthani camel traders at the Pushkar Fair. Photo credit Fionn Kidney / CC BY.

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