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Old Meets New in Tokyo

In a city consistently ranked as the cleanest and most friendly in the world, spending time in Tokyo isn’t difficult or unappealing. Ease of traveling, helpfulness of locals, and plenty of historical sights in addition to modern amenities puts Tokyo at the top of many travel guides’ lists of must-see places.

It is the capital of Japan and boasts the most populous metropolitan area in the world, 36 million people, and growing. The area is divided up into areas, or neighborhoods—each treated like small cities, which explains whyTokyo is frequently referred to as a “city of cities” affectionately. With so much to see, it could become overwhelming to plan an itinerary in Tokyo, but thankfully, Leaf Canoer Julia at vetaretus-6 has compiled a thorough list of sights and experience in this bustling city in her leaf “Things to see in Tokyo”.

The comparative aspect of old vs new makes Tokyo an endlessly interesting place to explore. Culture and way of life is passed down from generation to generation and a tradition of honor and loyalty is well-preserved in Japan in both architecture and attitude. But a booming economy also makes Tokyo home to many global corporations and the amenities are truly first class and state of the art. To fully appreciate Tokyo one has to be ready to dive in to the history while still appreciating modern technology and innovations that are to be found there. Below are a mix of “old vs new” Tokyo sights.

Hachiko Statue at Shibuya Station
It’s no secret that dogs are regarded as inspiringly loyal animals, and the story behind this statue demonstrates just how true that it. Waiting for his owner to come home from work each day at Shibuya Station, Hachiko became a local fixture in the early 1920’s. When his master died of a brain hemorrhage, this remarkable Akita continued to wait for his master each day for nearly a decade after he died. This statue was erected as a national symbol of loyalty to one’s family and to the Emperor, and remains a popular tourist attraction.

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Shop Til You Drop
When you’re ready to take advantage of a populated city, shopping is usually a part of the experience and Tokyo is no exception to a wide array of shopping venues. One particularly interesting area worth exploring is the fashion district of Takeshita-dori in Harajuku. Here one can find living art just watching the people passing by on the street. Don’t feel shy! Ask to photograph them and most people would be flattered to stop and pose. Shops and restaurants abound in the area so explore and pick up some of Japan’s quirky and delightful fashion expressions.

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Temples and Shrines
Worship is a very significant part of Japanese culture. Though there is not one mandated religion, the country is largely Shinto, an ethnic religion, or Buddhist. Buddhism arrived in Japan in the early 6th century and most Japanese death rituals are handled by Buddhist monks. There are many Shinto shrines available for patrons to attend and offer offerings and enjoy their peaceful atmosphere. One excellent shrine to consider visiting is Meiji Jingu, dedicated to Emperor Meiji and his Empress Shoken. After their deaths,  the loyal people of Japan donated over 100,000 trees to commemorate their virtues and created a lush forest amid a busy city. Tips are offered by user vetaretus-6 for showing proper etiquette while visiting Shinto shrines.

From the Water
One great way to take in Tokyo and appreciate it’s panorama is from a river cruise. There are a variety of options for routes, and vessels, including ferries, open air boats, water busses, and even enclosed boats for inclement weather. One option provides for pickups from hotels where you are escorted to the towering skyscraper of World Trade Center Tokyo. From the 40th floor, take in sweeping views of Tokyo, with a guide to answer any questions and provide information. Travel then through parts of the city on your way to Asakusa Kannon Temple, the oldest and most significant Buddhist temple in Tokyo. Passing briefly through a shopping district, you’ll head to the river where you’ll embark on a 45-minute river cruise, gliding under bridges all while hearing audio commentary about this historic city. (www.viator.com see Tokyo Highlights Afternoon Tour and Sumida River Cruise)

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Sky High Buildings
Skyscrapers are part of Tokyo’s iconic cityscape. It wouldn’t be proper to visit Tokyo without ascending one of it’s sky-high buildings and Mori Tower provides an unparalleled view of this metropolitan area. Observation decks on the 52nd and 54th floor are open to visitors. It is a fantastic place to capture some cityscape photography.

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Tokyo Dome City
A small entertainment complex in Bunkyo consists of the mega-arena Tokyo Dome, a spa and an amusement park complete with roller coasters. It is a great way to spend a few hours thrill-seeking and with ample opportunities for relaxation as well.

The contrast of city and nature, old and new, ancient custom and modern amenities make Tokyo a fantastic city to explore. It’s low crime rate and temperate climate should encourage one and all to spend some time in this world-class city.

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For more ideas of things to see in Tokyo visit LeafCanoer Julia’s leaf here and to read what other LeafCanoers have to say, download the LeafCanoe app.

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Top Hotspots and Eats in New Orleans

Take it all in slowly when you find yourself on a trip to New Orleans. There’s so many sights, smells and incredible music wafting through the air. Life in this boundless, vibrant city revolves around having a great time, so jump right in!

Learn more about New Orleans and the best places to eat by downloading the Leaf Canoe app for tips, photos and GPS itineraries by real travelers.

DSC_0044 (2)Brunch Delights

This is a tradition in New Orleans, or NOLA. Brunch can be an all-morning affair with tons of flavor, courses and a few beverages to boot. It can be tough to choose just one, so have one day spent at Brennan’s which has re-open to the public. The creamy drinks and tableside made bananas foster are unforgettable. Café Adelaide is also a wonderful pick, with a fun atmosphere that encourages ladies to wear classy Sunday hats for complimentary drinks.

A Little Sightseeing

Start with the expansive French Quarter and poke your head into some of the curiosities shops and Voodoo specialty stores. The square outside the St. Louis Cathedral is often filled with street performers, music and artists selling wares. This can be a little more laid back that the party-like atmosphere on Bourbon Street.

DSC_0114Stop for a Snack

You could eat all day in New Orleans and still not starch the surface. Many people will have small bites so they can try it all. A few fun places to enjoy include fried gator bites at Cochon or some signature beignets at Café Du Monde.

Have a Tasty Cocktail

To start the evening right, get off the main strip for a while and enjoy a cozy corner in the Q & C Hotel. This beautiful property has been recently renovated and giving off a wonderfully old school, chic feel, this is the perfect base to try a few of the city’s best libations. Try a classic, local creation called Sazerac, made from rye, bitters and Herbsaint.

DSC_0067 (2)Dine in Style

New Orleans has already been established as a culinary oasis that serves excellent dishes from many famous chefs. To truly capture the essence of southern hospitality and warmth, book a table well in advance at Arnaud’s. This historical stomping ground for anybody that’s somebody in NOLA, complete with countless elegant event spaces, distinct bars and lounges, giant dining areas and even a hidden small museum with Marti Gra dresses. Indulge in any of their selections, especially the array of delectable oysters.

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travel blogging

An Interview with Declan Bradley: The Newest LeafCanoe Ambassador

Have you heard of slow travel? People all across the globe will pack up their things and move from country to country over a long stretch of time to really get a feel for the spirit of each destination.

Irish Declan and English Emily are a couple pursuing a big dream – traveling the world together. These two have been travel blogging over at The Two Gallivants, which offers fun stories about their adventures in South East Asia and China.

We’re in awe of what they’ve accomplished and want to share it with you! Declan Bradley took the time to answer a few questions for the Leaf Canoe Community about his experiences on the road and with the Leaf Canoe app.

Are you interested in trying out the Leaf Canoe app too? Let us know!

When did you discover a love of travel and why  give up corporate life for this love?

I have a faint childhood memory of playing about near the base of the Laxey Wheel on the Isle of Man, a small island in the Irish Sea. I must have been about 4 or so and I was covered in oil from the massive wheel. My mum was in hysterics that I’d ruined my good holiday clothes, but I didn’t care – I was having the time of my life and I remember thinking that day that holidays were the best. Ever since then, I have always been excited about breaking from the daily grind, boarding a plane and heading somewhere that I had never been before.

After university when a lot of other students were taking the opportunity to travel before starting their careers, I said to myself “I’ll do it eventually” and put it on the backburner. Then, with my usual impatience, I rushed straight into a full on career in law. Whatever I do, be it pen pushing or travel, I tend to do it to the extremes. And so, at the tender age of 24, I flung myself head first into 80 hour weeks and working weekends, eager to get ahead in the law game. I didn’t let up for a few years and was often feeling the stress.

Then I went to Portugal with some friends to visit their family. Life there was much more relaxed and they were all very happy. It hit me then that I needed to slow down or I would burst. More than that, I realised that I had forgot all about my plans to see this beautiful world of ours. That act of slowing down in Portugal allowed my mind to shift away from my career and I made a plan to travel, to try something different for a while, to educate myself about how other people handle life and hopefully come back with a more mature and sustainable outlook towards a work/life balance.

A few years on and I have done what I set out to do. I left my job and traveled for a full year non-stop around Asia and with the prospect of heading back to London soon to pick up my career again, I am a much happier person because I did it!

A very happy me while travelling!

What has been your favorite travel memory so far?

A very difficult question indeed, there are so many! Angkor Wat gave me that first spine tingling “WOW! I’m travelling” sensation. Hoi An, where I lived for a month in an apartment by the river, holds many warm memories for me. I loved the solitude of my hike through Tiger Leaping Gorge in China. But if I have to chose just one, it’ll have to be reaching the summit of Mount Rinjani on Lomok, Indonesia. My best friend Ted flew out to meet me for a short holiday and I had him climbing the hard slog up Mount Rinjani on a three day/two night trek. You can read all the details on my blog! It is sufficient to say for these purposes that the trek was the single hardest activity I have ever done. So reaching the very top of the active volcano was one of the greatest physical achievements of my life, and getting there with my best mate made it all the better! Did I mention the view…

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Are you a fan of travel technologies and why?

I have my own travel website, so I would hope so! I think travel technologies such as planning sites, like TripAdvisor and the thousands of wonderful travel blogs out there, and sharing apps, like your very own Leafcanoe or the Instagrams or Pinterests of this world, are useful tools to motivate others to get out there. There is an argument though that too much information or photos beforehand can spoil the surprise of travel or lead to over tourism of certain areas. But to answer those critics, I would say that travel is almost never like it is on the screen and there are too many travel snobs that think they alone have an inherent right to experience the wonders of this planet. There is truth though that a general increase in worldwide travel means a greater onus on sustainable tourism and travel technology companies should do their bit to educate travelers on the dangers of exploitation in whatever form it assumes.

Oh, and one last thing, while I think technology is a good thing for travel, remember that you should have the experience – not your camera!

When you received the first version of the LeafCanoe, what impressed you the most, though it was still in a very rusty stage? What’s your vision for such a community-based travel knowledge sharing platform?

Leafcanoe was in an early stage when I first tried it last year, but I could see its great potential. The main thing that stood out to me was the ease with which I could beautifully record my experiences using photos, text and audio and readers could see exactly where I was using the GPS feature. So you can pack a lot in with little effort.

I think I touched on my own vision for travel sharing apps in my previous answer – a forum for people to learn about the world in a responsible way.

Any future travel plans that will be captured in LeafCanoe?

I recently posted a new “Leaf” about a family reunion I had with my parents and my brother in Australia. I finished a year’s travelling in Asia at the end of 2014 and my parents flew out to my brother, who lives in Perth, for New Year. So Perth seemed like the perfect destination after my travels, just a pity my sister Clare couldn’t be there, who was back home in Ireland.

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And stayed tuned for new leaves about Australia Day, which we spent in Fremantle, Perth and culminated in an awesome firework display, and our lives as locals in London when we return in February.

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Top 5 Places to Catch Good Tunes in Boston

Rappers and country singers, undiscovered and huge stars, Boston is equipped to host all the hottest musical acts of our time. There’s beautiful venues strewn about the city that can host everyone from rockers to jam and lovers and people in between. This time of year is perfect to purchase tickets and cozy up in one of the best Boston music venues, big and small.

Want even more ideas for Boston music hotspots than the ones below? Sign up for the list to gain exclusive access to the LeafCanoe app. See the great itineraries locals and travelers have posted of their adventures!

Paradise Rock Club

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Rockers, this is the place for you. It boasts a deep, rich history in the city that dates back to 1977 and has welcome classic bands like Phish, REM and even U2 to its stage. Due to its intimate setting, many students will wander into Paradise for small shows and the chance to see bands right before they hit it big. It underwent a big makeover in 2010, but still hold on to its original vibe with a black interior and small front stage.

Middle East

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There’s several ways to enjoy this iconic venue located in Cambridge. They technically have four different venues rolled into one, with several floors of space and plenty of areas to jam. Grab dinner at the restaurant first, then wander up ro downstairs to listen to fantastic DJs, up and coming acoustic artists and old favorites.

TT & the Bears

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Right next door to the Middle East, it’s easy to miss if you’re not looking for it. This venue often features smaller acts that re edgy, eclectic and love to get people moving. If you dig local music, this is where you will find it, seven nights a week. Usually multiple bands are booked for one evening, so you can enjoy a sample of great tunes covering rock, hip hop, punk and more.

Wang Theater

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Time to get a little classier and head downtown. As one of Boston most aesthetically impressive music venues, this feels more like going to a Broadway show than a concert. Completed and opened to the public in 1925, the Wan Theater has been remarkably maintained and remains one of the top five largest stages in the country. See legends play from John Mellencamp to the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.  Alongside the music performances, you can catch comedians, radio personalities and the Boston Ballet.

House of Blues

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An institution in its own right, the House of Blues is fairly new to the Boston scene compared to other venues. Opened in 2009 right across the street from Fenway Park, it has brought sold out shows to the city consistently and shows no sign of slowing down. There used to be a 200-seat House of Blues in Cambridge that closed in 2003, so this new spot is much bigger and better. Coming up, you can catch any and all hit performers, including country singer Sam Hunt, rocker Marilyn Manson and funky George Clinton.

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Exploring Boston’s North End Neighborhood

Although most people wander into this neighborhood for some Italian cuisine, there’s so much else to enjoy outside of a spaghetti dinner. Explore a little further to discover even more great things about this European spirited corner of Boston.

Step Back in Time

Sunday morning

Start at the Old North Church when checking out the North End for its past historic significance. This is where Paul Revere was said to light lanterns that triggered his famous midnight ride during the American Revolution. On one side of the church down the street is the Copp’s Hill Bury Ground, filled with more than 10,000 graves of notable Boston figures, such as the man who designed the USS Constitution battle ship. Another block or two away is Paul Revere’s home that has been resorted and converted into a small museum.

Grab a Few Sweets

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You are in the perfect spot for satisfying a sweet tooth. The North End is loaded with wonderful bakeries and sweet shops to please any palette. The most famous is Mike’s Pastries, featuring authentic cannoli and lobster tails for sale if you are willing to wait in line. For a slower paced experience, cozy up to a table at Caffé Vittoria that looks and feels like a real European watering hole. They serve strong coffees, liqueurs and gelato alongside the pastries.

Finish with a Laugh

Although it’s not a tradition or historic mark in town, the North end does boast some stellar entertainment that has been a mainstay in the North End for years. After dinner, dessert and drinks, you can wander to the Improv Asylum for a one-of-a-kind show almost every night. On weekends shows run early evening and at midnight. There is a rotating seasonal cast that performs skits pertaining to current events and pop culture that is hilarious. Some of the material is a little risqué, so be aware this is not for the faint of heart. But it can be a perfect way to conclude a fun day strolling through Boston’s scenic and fascinating North End neighborhood.

Discover more gems in the North End neighborhood on the Leaf Canoe app!

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Where to Roam in Nova Scotia

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Choosing a vacation destination doesn’t mean you have to go south to sunnier skies. There are some incredible places to explore in the northern hemisphere too, especially during the Spring and fall seasons. Weather conditions can be ideal to take long weekend road trips, check out small towns and sightseeing through big urban sprawls.

One of my favorite locations is Nova Scotia – Canada’s scenic province of wine, seafood, sun and coastline.

Small Town Charm

Landing in the town of Yarmouth via the speedy NovaStar ferry from Maine, it was an ideal introduction to the area. Although small, this spot welcomes visitors from all over the world and has a great information center right on the waterfront. Plenty of bed and breakfasts line the residential streets, such as the charming MacKinnnon-Cann Inn. For some fresh seafood, including flaky white fish and mussels, guests can grab a table at Rudder’s. This would also be the perfect opportunity to try some Canadian poutine, which is french fries covered in gravy and cheese curds.

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A Beautiful Capital City

About a three hour drive from Yarmouth is the capital city of Halifax. Highlights include a n iconic citadel as the centerpiece of the city, with tours daily that offer historical accounts on past battles and wars. The views of the harbor from the top of the citadel are sweeping and gorgeously panoramic.

When choosing a place to stay in Halifax, location downtown was key. Luckily, the chic Prince George Hotel exceeded expectations and provided the perfect, elegant base for exploration. Rooms were beautifully plush and freshly decorated, and the lobby bar was always buzzing with action. Just a quick walk out the front door brought us to the Obladee Wine Bar to sample some local Nova Scotian white wines. Then a cab ride was all it took to be in culinary bliss at the trendy Field Guide for shared plates and craft cocktails.

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Along Two Coasts

The north and south coasts of Nova Scotia are vastly different. Stay north to enjoy miles of wooded scenery and rocky, coastal towns. A great stop between Yarmouth and Halifax is Lunenburg, which was named a UNESCO World Heritage site for being a famous old fishing town. On the way back down, it would be a shame to not experience the other opposite coastline and the Bay of Fundy. It’s a body of water with a unique shade of copper brown, boasting dramatic cliffs and spectacular views.

Want to follow this Nova Scotia adventure leaf-by-leaf? Sign up to be a beta tester for LeafCanoe for a sneak peek at my travel itinerary though Canada, complete with photos, tips and more memories!

 

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Dine out without breaking the bank in Hell’s Kitchen

Once a rough and tumble quarter full of Irish immigrants and hot dog carts, Hell’s Kitchen is now a fashionable Midtown neighborhood that boasts some of the best eateries on the isle of Manhattan. Its proximity to the theater district and the famed Actors Studio has long made Hell’s Kitchen a haven for the artistically minded, and now that the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater has made its home there, the area is even more of a hot spot for Manhattanites and tourists alike. But, you can’t drain your wallet every time you want a night out in the city, so here is a list of some of the best inexpensive (and fun) restaurants in Hell’s Kitchen that could please even the fussiest foodie.

Empanada Mama

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While Empanada Mama on 9th Ave has a full menu, including entrees, salads, and desserts, you really need to try some of their famous empanadas. With over 40 flavors to choose from, you will be able to satisfy your appetite for something savory with the Caribbean-style pork filled Brasil empanada, something spicy with the Spicy Chicken Empanada, and something sweet with the American as apple pie USA empanada. Allergies? Fear not, empanadas come in both wheat and corn flour. Picky eaters? There is a plain old burger on the menu too. All empanadas are priced between $2 and $3 each, which will leave you plenty of cash to try one of their delicious drinks too!

Stecchino

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 Stecchino’s is known for its Italian-style burgers. While you can grab an entree here, the best bang for your buck is one of the burger plates which range between $12.50 and $14.50. These burgers range from the adventurous, The Butchers Block pork and black truffle burger, to the aristocratic, Caesar’s Palazzo with shredded romaine and Caesar dressing. Each plate comes with a generous helping of the familiar and the unexpected, and every burger satisfies. IF by some chance you are still hungry after dinner, you can always top things off with a traditional cannoli for dessert.

Merilu Pizza Al Metro

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Pizza is always the perfect choice, whether you are dining with a large group or a small one, and New York always knows how to do pizza right. At Merilu’s you can go for a plain NY Pie for as little as $12 or a Prosciutto di Param Pizza for $23, or grab one of their delicious salads or homemade Italian dishes to satisfy your appetite. The folks at Merilu’s have a huge menu for you to choose from, and even offer gluten free options, because no one should have to live without pizza. You can round off the night with some Classic Nutella.

 

 

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Top 4 unique workout routines in NYC

Even on vacation, travelers who are always on the move will be looking for somewhere to burn off their energy. In New York, a concrete jungle full of tasty cuisine, hot nightclubs and attractions to explore, it can be easy to throw out your usual fitness routine. However, locals know that there are countless places to work out that are way beyond the realms of treadmills and aerobics. Here are some fun spots to meet others while burning calories in Manhattan.

Anti-Gravity Aerial Yoga

Have you ever gone to a Circe du Solei show and dreamed of flying through the air like the acrobats? A studio on west 37th street has developed an ‘Anti-gravity” method of yoga that uses similar hammock-like materials to suspend participants in the air. They go through moves typically found in yoga, but defy the elements and work new muscle groups, reliving gravity’s tension and pull. Jump into a class and quickly learn the ropes to have a blast working out.

Indoor rock climbing at Chelsea Piers

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This gigantic indoor rock wall can be found at a big sports complex on the water, complete with ice rink, gold club and spa, to name a few. Have the expert staff teach you climbing basics, then work toward conquering the wall, which offers more than 11,000 square feet of fun to cover.

Try movement mixed with drama

Perhaps you’d like to avoid gym-like setting all together on a trip to New York City. Join other theater goers for a unique and interactive experience at Sleep No More, a Shakespeare play set inside a massive warehouse. This is not a vigorous workout, but it is a way to immerse in a play while walking and running through a live, haunting and theatric environment. Each performance lasts three hours, which is a great amount of time to be on your feet. Follow actors and let them actually lead you by the hand through room to figure out the story.

Simply have a run at Central Park

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The biggest and most iconic green spot in Manhattan is a haven for fitness buffs. Connect with the Central Park runner’s group to stay safe and let them show you the best routes for running. See all the beautiful scenery of this area while energizing your body and getting away from the city for a spell.

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Take a Look at a Book in New York City

Nothing beats the smell of old books stacked high in a sunny bookstore on a charming summer day. New York City is full of bibliophiles who love to frequent independent and big-names book shops throughout Manhattan, on the hunt for the latest release or just a calm spot to read. Some of coffee and desserts inside, while others may be bare bones but offer free wifi and a chance to browse. Every local swears by their favorite, so travelers will have to try a few to decide on their own preferred book haven in the Big Apple.

Unoppressive Non-Imperialist Bargain Books

Travelers with a sense of humor and a love of all things quirky will want to make a beeline for 34 Carmine Street in the East Village. The shop is called “Unoppressive Non-Imperialist Bargain Books”. Really. It says so on their sign. It’s open really late as well, even until midnight on the weekends, so it can be worth stopping by for a book to conclude the night with back at your hotel. Most literary finds only run a few dollars and staff are more than willing to offer a few recommendations. It might not carry the newest bestsellers on your list, but it’s perfect for discovering a hidden gem not many have read.

Bluestockings

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Ladies flock to this shop, as it used to be a strictly feminist hangout and bookstore. Nowadays it has a more inclusive stance, but has still stayed true to its global justice and equality roots. There are more than 6,000 titles ranging from magazines about women’s rights to biographies of those incarcerated. This is the place to learn, as they also hosts various workshops, discussions and even performances on the daily.

St. Mark’s

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Among the student crowd in the Lower East Side is this shop, holding some wonderfully written masterpieces just dying to be picked up. St Mark’s Bookstore has been around for decades and has withstood the test of time and popularization of Kindles. Every month, they welcome an author to do a reading and signing as well, which would be a fun alternative activity to try while in the city. The décor is simple and unpretentious, allowing for a safe space to curl up with a new read and get lost in its story.

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Top small music venues in NYC

Manhattan has some of the most creative and musical residents in the world. People travel from all corners of the globe to make it big as rockstars, on Broadway or anything in between. This gives everyone a chance to showcase their talents and also be witness to some incredible live music in almost every corner of the city. No matter if you are into rock, indie, soul, hip hop or even orchestral, there is a place for you to treat your ears to fantastic entertainment.

Beekman Beer Garden

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Most people do not head to NYC for the beaches, but there is in fact a city man-made shore overlooking the East River that doubles as a music venue. The Beekman has featured acts such as Eric Prydz, Moe., and even George Clinton on the past to patrons hanging out on the sand and in glowing, funky chairs outside. More energetic travelers can enjoy the massive dance space, or challenge a friend to a ping-pong or pool game on the premises. It’s located off of South St.

Gramercy Theater

Live Nation is dominating in ticket sales throughout NYC and the country – so they’ve decided to take creating concert venues into their own hands. The Gramercy Theater was born out of an old movie theater from the 1930s and re-designed to accommodate about 600 music fans at once. Some bands coming up on the calendar include Bassface, Wheatus and Switchfoot.

Living Room

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On Ludlow Street is a little gem that has a great coffee house feel and an intimate setting. Made famous by Norah Jones, the Living Room now features relaxed, singer-songwriter acts throughout the week. Some shows are so laid-back that the singer will make up songs on the spot, so guests can be sure they’re hearing completely original tunes. During the day, kids can even get in on the fun and hear some friendly jingles from famous rockers, like Nada Surf and the Hold Steady.

Jalopy

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Big lights and exciting bands are the draw to most NYC shows, but sometimes locals and travelers also want to get away from it all. Jalopy offers this ambiance on Columbus St. with its curtained stage and charming libations served in mason jars. People who get inspired can stick around for music classes as well, with instruments available to rent in concentrations of mandolin, ukelele, guitar and fiddle.

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